The Large Hadron Collider

Incident at the LHC

19 September 2008

During powering tests of the main dipole circuit in Sector 3-4 of the LHC, a fault occurs in the electrical bus connection in the region between a dipole and a quadrupole, resulting in mechanical damage and release of helium from the magnet cold mass into the tunnel. Proper safety procedures are in force, the safety systems perform as expected, and no-one is put at risk.

More about the incident: 

A full technical analysis of the incident is available here

Or read an analysis of the LHC incident on CERN's press office website

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Inauguration of the LHC

21 October 2008

The Japanese Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, T. Yamauchi, draws a second eye on the Daruma doll to mark the completion of the LHC project. In line with Japanese tradition, this Daruma doll, offered to CERN's Director-General in 1995, was painted with one eye at the start of the project.

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Final magnet goes underground after LHC repair

30 April 2009

The 53rd and final replacement magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is lowered into the accelerator tunnel, marking the end of repair work above ground following the incident in September the year before that brought the LHC operations to a halt.

 

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The LHC is put into standby mode

16 December 2009

The LHC ends its first full period of operation. Collisions at 2.36 TeV set a new world record and bring to a close a successful first run for the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. The LHC is put into standby mode for a short technical stop to prepare for higher energy collisions and the start of the main research programme. Over the 2009 run, each of the LHC’s four major experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb recorded more than one million particle collisions, which are distributed for analysis around the world on the LHC computing grid. 

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The LHC starts again after a short technical stop

28 February 2010

After a short technical stop, beams circulate again on 28 February 2010. A month later, on 19 March, two 3.5 TeV proton beams successfully circulate in the Large Hadron Collider for the first time. This is the highest energy yet achieved in a particle accelerator and an important step on the way to the start of the LHC research programme. 

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First LHC collisions at 7 TeV

30 March 2010

(Image: Martin Aleksa, Lyndon Evans, Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni toast running at 7 TeV)

After initial lower energy collision physics from November 2009 onwards, ATLAS records collisions at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy for the first time. Particle physicists around the world anticipate a rich harvest of new physics as the LHC begins its first long run at an energy three and a half times higher than previously achieved at a particle accelerator.

Explore resources prepared for media

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Archive of important events in CERN's history for press

LHC proton run for 2011 reaches successful conclusion

18 October 2011

The grand total of data delivered by the LHC during the year reaches almost six inverse femtobarns. At the beginning of the year’s run, the objective for the LHC was to deliver a quantity of data known to physicists as one inverse femtobarn – approximately 100 trillion (102) proton-proton collisions – during the course of 2011. The first inverse femtobarn came on 17 June, setting the experiments up well for the major physics conferences of the summer and requiring the 2011 data objective to be revised upwards to five inverse femtobarns. This milestone is reached on 18 Octobe

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Tantalising hints of the Higgs

13 December 2011

In a seminar, the ATLAS and CMS experiments present the status of their searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. Their results are based on the analysis of considerably more data than those presented at the summer conferences, enough to make significant progress in the search for the Higgs boson, but not enough to make any conclusive statement on the existence or non-existence of the elusive Higgs. The main conclusion is that the Standard Model Higgs boson, if it exists, is most likely to have a mass constrained to the range 116-130 GeV by the ATLAS experiment, and 115-127 GeV by CMS. Tantalising hints were seen by both experiments in this mass region, but they were not yet strong enough to claim a discovery.

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