The Large Hadron Collider

Record collision energy of 8TeV

5 April 2012

(image: event recorded with the CMS detector in 2012 at a proton-proton centre of mass energy of 8TeV)

LHC physics data-taking gets underway at a new record collision energy of 8TeV. The LHC declares "stable beams" as two 4 TeV proton beams are brought into collision at the LHC’s four interaction points. This signals the start of physics data-taking by the LHC experiments for 2012.  The collision energy of 8 TeV is a new world record, and increases the machine’s discovery potential considerably.

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ATLAS and CMS observe a particle consistent with the Higgs boson

4 July 2012

On 4 July 2012, as a curtain raiser to the year’s major particle physics conference, ICHEP 2012 in Melbourne, the ATLAS and CMS experiments present their latest preliminary results in the search for the long-sought Higgs particle. Both experiments have observed a new particle in the mass region around 125-126 GeV. The next step is to determine the precise nature of the particle and its significance for our understanding of the universe.

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End of LHC Run 1: First shutdown begins

16 February 2013

At 8.25am the shift crew in the CERN Control Centre extract the beams from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the last time before the machine's first Long Shutdown. The two-year shutdown will see a hive of maintenance activity on all of CERN's accelerators. Work on the LHC will include the consolidation of more than 10,000 interconnections between magnets. The entire ventilation system for the 628-metre circumference Proton Synchrotron will be replaced, as will over 100 kilometres of cables on the Super Proton Synchrotron. The LHC is scheduled to resume in 2015.

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François Englert and Peter W. Higgs awarded 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics

8 October 2013

François Englert (left) and Peter Higgs at CERN on 4 July 2012, on the occasion of the announcement of the discovery of a Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN)

 

On 8 October 2013, CERN congratulates François Englert and Peter W. Higgs on the award of the Nobel Prize in physics “for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.”

The Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) mechanism was first proposed in 1964 in two independently published papers: the first by Belgian physicists Robert Brout and François Englert, and the second by British physicist Peter Higgs. It explains how the force responsible for beta decay is much weaker than electromagnetism, but is better known as the mechanism that endows fundamental particles with mass. A third paper, published by Americans Gerald Guralnik and Carl Hagen with their British colleague Tom Kibble further contributed to the development of the new idea, which now forms an essential part of the Standard Model of particle physics. As was pointed out by Higgs, a key prediction of the idea is the existence of a massive boson of a new type, which was discovered by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN in 2012.

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LHC experiments back in business at record energy of 13 TeV

3 June 2015

After an almost two-year shutdown and several months of re-commissioning, the LHC delivers collisions to all of its experiments at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV, almost double the collision energy of its first run. This marks the start of run 2 at the LHC, opening the way to new discoveries. The LHC will run round the clock for the next three years.

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LHCb discovers exotic pentaquark particles

14 July 2015

The LHCb experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider reports the discovery of a class of particles known as pentaquarks.

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ALICE makes precise comparison of light nuclei and antinuclei

17 August 2015

The ALICE experiment at the LHC publishes a result in Nature Physics confirming a fundamental symmetry of nature to an unprecedented precision for light nuclei. The precise measurement of the difference between ratios of the mass and electric charge of light nuclei and antinuclei are based on the ALICE experiment’s abilities to track and identify particles produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at the LHC.

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ATLAS and CMS shed light on Higgs properties

1 September 2015

Three years after the discovery of the Higgs boson, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations present combined measurements of the many of its properties at the Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference 2015. By combining their analyses of the data collected in 2011 and 2012, ATLAS and CMS draw the sharpest picture of the newly-discovered particle.

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