All events

17 November 2008

Prime Minister of the Republic of Turkey R. T. Erdogan, visiting the LHC tunnel with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

Timelines
National Visitors
21 October 2008

Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Morocco to the United Nations Office Ambassador M. Loulichki welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

Timelines
National Visitors
21 October 2008

In line with Japanese tradition, this Daruma doll was painted with one eye to mark the start of the LHC project. The Japanese Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology T. Yamauchi adds the second eye to mark the completion of the project. 

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
19 September 2008

On 19 September 2008, during powering tests of the main dipole circuit in Sector 3-4 of the LHC, a fault occurs in the electrical bus connection in the region between a dipole and a quadrupole, resulting in mechanical damage and release of helium from the magnet cold mass into the tunnel. Proper safety procedures are in force, the safety systems perform as expected, and no-one is put at risk.

Timelines
The history of CERN, The Large Hadron Collider
10 September 2008

At 10.28am on 10 September 2008 a beam of protons is successfully steered around the 27-kilometre Large Hadron Collider (LHC) for the first time. The machine is ready to embark on a new era of discovery at the high-energy frontier.

LHC experiments address questions such as what gives matter its mass, what the invisible 96% of the universe is made of, why nature prefers matter to antimatter and how matter evolved from the first instants of the universe’s existence.

Explore the resources prepared for press.

Timelines
The history of CERN, CERN accelerators, The Large Hadron Collider, The search for the Higgs boson, Archive of important events in CERN's history for press
23 July 2008

The pixel detector barrel is the last large piece of the CMS detector to be lowered into the cavern. 

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
10 June 2008

Prime Minister P. Mosisli walks accross the ATLAS surface hall with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni. Mrs Mosisli follows.

Timelines
National Visitors
31 March 2008

Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador A. Abdullatif Abdulla, Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bahrain to the United Nations Office and specialised institutions in Geneva.

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National Visitors
29 February 2008

A component known as a small wheel is the last large piece of the ATLAS detector to be lowered into the cavern. The ATLAS detector has the largest volume of any detector ever constructed.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
10 January 2008

Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation  H. F. B. H. Yusof visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Advisers for International Relations E. Tsesmelis and J. Ellis.

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National Visitors
7 December 2007

Minister of Education and Science S. Backovic (centre) visiting the ALICE exhibition at Point 2 with Heidelberg University and member of the Collaboration S. Damjanovic (left) and Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft.

Timelines
National Visitors
9 November 2007

In November 2007, the Auger project published results showing that the direction of origin of the 27 highest energy events were strongly correlated with the location of active galactic nuclei (AGN). An active galactic nucleus is a compact region at the centre of a galaxy that has a much higher than normal luminosity over at least some portion, and possibly all, of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Timelines
Cosmic rays
7 November 2007

(Image: ISCOOL, an ion cooler and buncher installed at ISOLDE)

An ion cooler and buncher, ISCOOL, is installed in the HRS section of ISOLDE. Beams with strongly reduced emittances and energy spreads are now available for all experiments downstream the beam line.

Timelines
ISOLDE
25 October 2007

Minister of Education, Culture and Science R. Plasterk (3rd) in the ATLAS experimental cavern with NIKHEF Director F. Linde, CERN Deputy Director-General J. Engelen, Ambassador J. van Eenennaam, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Mission Representative G. Vrielink and ATLAS Magnet Project Leader H. ten Kate.

Timelines
National Visitors
12 July 2007

Minister for Employment C. H. Frederiksen (right) visiting the LHC tunnel with CERN Deputy Director-General and Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen.

Timelines
National Visitors
3 July 2007

Ambassador A. Navarro Llanos, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Bolivia to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing a Co-operation Agreement concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics with CERN Director General R. Aymar.

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National Visitors
3 June 2007

President M. Bachelet Jeria of Chile visiting the ATLAS experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

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National Visitors
22 May 2007

President of the National Academy of Sciences M. Kerimov.

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National Visitors
26 April 2007

The last superconducting magnet is lowered down an access shaft to the LHC. The 15-metre dipoles, each weighing 35 tonnes, are the most complex components of the machine. In total, 1232 dipoles were lowered to 50 metres below the surface via a special oval shaft. They were then taken through a transfer tunnel to their final destination in the LHC tunnel, carried by a specially designed vehicle travelling at 3 kilometres per hour.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
20 November 2006

The ATLAS Barrel Toroid, a characteristic component of the detector, then the largest superconducting magnet ever built, was switched on for the first time. It works together with the two Endcap Toroids and central Solenoid magnet systems to bend the paths of charged particles produced in collisions at the LHC, enabling important properties to be measured.

Timelines
The ATLAS experiment
20 November 2006

The ATLAS Barrel Toroid, then the largest superconducting magnet ever built, was switched on for the first time at CERN on 20 November 2006. The magnet is called the Barrel Toroid because of its barrel-like shape.

It provides a powerful magnetic field for ATLAS, one of the major particle detectors taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The magnet consists of eight superconducting coils, each in the shape of a round-cornered rectangle, 5 metres wide, 25m long and weighing 100 tonnes, all aligned to millimetre precision.

Timelines
The history of CERN
14 November 2006

Minister for Higher Education and Scientific Research R. Haraoubia (right) with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

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National Visitors
4 April 2006

HM Queen Sonja of Norway receiving a bouquet from K. Rolme as HM King Harald V (right), Foreign Minister J. Gahr Sthore (centre rear) and CERN Director-General look on.

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National Visitors
27 October 2005

Ambassador J.A. Fernandez Palacios, Permanent representative of the Republic of Cuba to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland meets with CERN Director-General R. Aymar on the occasion of a courtesy visit.

Timelines
National Visitors
1 February 2005

After six and a half years of work, CERN leaders and dignitaries celebrate the completion of a second detector cavern. The CMS cavern is 53 x 27 x 24 metres. To make space for the enormous detector, 250,000 cubic metres of soil have been removed from the detector cavern and a second space that houses technical components.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
19 October 2004

CERN celebrated its 50th anniversary in style, with the inauguration of the Globe of Science and Innovation (pictured, under construction) on 19 October. A gift from the Swiss Confederation, the Globe is an iconic wooden structure first used for the Swiss national exhibition in 2002 as a pavilion dedicated to the theme of sustainable development. It was designed by architects Thomas Büchi and Hervé Dessimoz of Geneva. The Globe is being developed into a new visitor and networking centre for the Laboratory — a focal point for CERN’s interaction with society.

Timelines
The history of CERN, Archive of important events in CERN's history for press
1 July 2004

(Image: A 3-D drawing of the Class A Lab with a photo inset)

The new Class A building at ISOLDE is built to enable UCx target material to be produced and irradiated targets to be handled safely. The Class A laboratory is equipped with fume cupboards, full protective measures and aerosol monitoring. It can handle 150 g UO2 per day, corresponding to two target containers.

Timelines
ISOLDE
14 June 2004

Minister of Science, Research and Technology J. Tofighi signing an agreement with CERN Deputy Director-General J. Engelen, CMS Resources Manager A. Petrilli looks on.

 
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National Visitors
8 June 2004

Minister of Labour P. Swain.

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National Visitors
6 May 2004

European Investment Bank President and Chairman of the Board of Directors P. Maystadt in the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

 
 
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National Visitors
1 March 2004

Vice-Minister of Industry and Trade A. Issekeshev.

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National Visitors
19 February 2004

The aim of the European Datagrid project was to produce a "production quality" computing Grid, in anticipation of the construction of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. According to the project's website:

The objective is to build the next generation computing infrastructure providing intensive computation and analysis of shared large-scale databases, from hundreds of terabytes to petabytes, across widely distributed scientific communities

Timelines
Computing at CERN
21 January 2004

Ambassador S.H. Johannesson, Permanent Representative of Iceland to the United Nations Office in Geneva .

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National Visitors
11 December 2003

President Mesic (2d from left) visiting the ATLAS cavern with CERN Director-General R. Aymar, Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior Scientist D. Denegri.

Timelines
National Visitors
5 November 2003

The LHC forward collaboration proposes to build two small calorimeters near the ATLAS detector for high-energy cosmic ray research.

Read the LHCf letter of intent

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
21 October 2003

Upon completing its 100th surface detector, the Pierre Auger Observatory became the largest cosmic-ray air shower array in the world. The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector that uses two independent methods of detecting and studying cosmic rays. The observatory detects high-energy particles through their interaction with water placed in the surface detector tanks. The other method of detection is through tracking the development of air showers through observing the ultraviolet light emitted high in the earth’s atmosphere. 

Timelines
Cosmic rays
23 September 2003

Minister and Science and Technology Committee Chair, Belarus Council of Ministers A. Rusetskyof.

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National Visitors
15 September 2003

The following is an extract from: "The LHC computing grid project at CERN" (Lamanna, 2004)

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Computing at CERN
15 July 2003

The photomultiplier tubes within these basketball-sized glass orbs are at the heart of the AMANDA neutrino telescope, a novel telescope being built at the South Pole to detect cosmic neutrinos (Image: Jeff Miller)


Timelines
Cosmic rays
4 July 2003

Minister for Trade and Economic Development K. Chshmaritian (4th from left) with A. Kotzinian, ATLAS Technical Coordiator M. Nessi, Ambassador Z. Mnatsakanian, JINR Vice-Director A. Sissakian and Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, in front of the ATLAS experiment model in building 40.

Timelines
National Visitors
4 June 2003

After three years of work, the ATLAS detector cavern (35 x 55 x 40 metres) is fully excavated and completed. CERN officials and dignitaries celebrate the first new LHC cavern on 4 June 2003, complete with an alpinhorn player.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
4 June 2003

After five years of innovative and ingenious civil engineering, the ATLAS detector cavern (35 x 55 x 40 metres) was fully excavated. ATLAS, CERN officials, and political authorities, including the President of the Swiss Confederation Pascal Couchepin, celebrated the inauguration of the first cavern on the Large Hadron Collider on 4 June 2003. Installation of the detector in the cavern began soon after. 

Timelines
The ATLAS experiment
18 September 2002

Two CERN experiments, ATHENA and ATRAP, created thousands of atoms of antimatter in a “cold” state in 2002. Cold means that the atoms are slow moving, which makes it possible to study them before they meet ordinary matter and annihilate. Antihydrogen formed in the experiments when cold positrons and antiprotons were brought together and held in a specially designed “trap”. Once formed, the electrically neutral antihydrogen atoms drifted out of the trap and annihilated.

Find out more

Timelines
The story of antimatter
5 July 2002

Construction workers use a modified cement truck on stilts to reinforce the floor of the ATLAS cavern. 

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
31 May 2002

A digger removes the final sods of earth from the sides of the cavern that will house the ATLAS detector. 

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
12 March 2002

Crown Prince of Bhutan HRH Dasho Jigme Khesar Namgyal Wangchuck visiting CMS experiment assembly hall.

 
 
Timelines
National Visitors
31 October 2001

A new accelerator, REX-ISOLDE, is put into operation on 31 October 2001. This post-accelerator has opened up new fields of research using radioactive ion beams of higher energies. REX-ISOLDE can provide post-accelerated nuclei covering the whole mass range from He to U for reaction studies and Coulomb excitation with energies up to 3 MeV/u. To this day, REX has accelerated over 100 isotopes of more than 30 different elements.

Timelines
ISOLDE
26 January 2001

Ambassador B. Bowa, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Zambia to the United Nations Office at Geneva.

Timelines
National Visitors
2 November 2000

The Large Electron-Positron collider was shut down for the last time at 8am on 2 November 2000. Members of government from around the world gathered at CERN on 9 October to celebrate the achievements of LEP and its 11 years of operational life. With the tunnel now  available for work, teams began excavating the caverns to house the four big detectors on the Large Hadron Collider.

Timelines
The Large Electron-Positron Collider, The history of CERN, CERN accelerators
11 June 1999

Bulgaria became a full member state of CERN on 11 June, when it gave UNESCO its instrument of ratification of the constitutive Convention of CERN.

Timelines
Member states
17 September 1998

LHCb is the fourth experiment approved for the LHC. The experiment will study the phenomenon known as CP violation, which would help to explain why matter dominates antimatter in the universe.

Timelines
The history of CERN, The Large Hadron Collider
10 July 1998

As construction workers are preparing the work site for the CMS-detector cavern, they unearth 4th century Gallo-Roman ruins. The find delays work for 6 months while archaeologists excavate the site. 

The archaeologists find a Gallo-Roman villa with surrounding fields, as well as coins from Ostia (a seaport of Rome), Lyons in France (then Gaul) and London.

 

 

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
15 February 1998

The Monopole and Exotics Detector at the LHC proposes to build a detector to search for highly ionizing particles and slow exotic decays at the LHC. The letter of intent marks the first official use of the name MoEDAL. It will be the LHC’s seventh detector.

Read the MoEDAL letter of intent

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
19 December 1997

At the December session of the CERN council, representatives of the United States sign an agreement to contribute $531 million to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. Martha Krebs, Director of the Office of Energy Research (DOE) and Bob Eisenstein, Assistant Director of Physical and Mathematical Science at the National Science Foundation sign on behalf of the US, and CERN Director-General Christopher Llewellyn Smith signs on behalf of the laboratory.

At the same meeting, the US is granted observer status at CERN.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
15 August 1997

The Total Cross Section, Elastic Scattering Diffraction Dissociation collaboration proposes to build a detector to measure the basic properties of proton-proton collisions at high energy. The letter of intent marks the first official use of the name TOTEM.

Read the TOTEM letter of intent

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
25 February 1997

Satellite image showing spring ice melt underway on Lake Baikal (Image: NASA Earth Observatory)

NT200, a detector in lake Baikal played a pioneering role in neutrino astronomy. NT200 was constructed between 1993 and 1998. However, in 1994 NT200 detected two neutrino events when only 36 of the final 192 photodetectors were set up. These were the first of several hundred thousand atmospheric neutrinos which NT200 later detected.

Timelines
Cosmic rays
14 February 1997

The CERN research board officially approves the ALICE experiment. Re-using the L3 magnet experiment from the LEP, ALICE is designed to study quark-gluon plasma, a state of matter that would have existed in the first moments of the universe.

Timelines
The history of CERN, The Large Hadron Collider
7 February 1997

In 1996 CERN's antiproton machines – the Antiproton Accumulator (AC), the Antiproton Collector and the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) – were closed down to free resources for the Large Hadron Collider. But a community of antimatter scientists wanted to continue their LEAR experiments with slow antiprotons. Council asked the Proton Synchrotron division to investigate a low-cost way to provide the necessary low-energy beams.

Timelines
The story of antimatter, CERN accelerators, The history of CERN
31 January 1997

Four years after the first technical proposals, the experiments CMS and ATLAS are officially approved. Both are general-purpose experiments designed to explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, including the Higgs boson.

Timelines
The history of CERN, The Large Hadron Collider
20 October 1995

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is approved by the CERN council in December 1994. The LHC study group publish the LHC Conceptual Design Report, which details the architecture and operation of the LHC, in October 1995.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider, CERN accelerators
5 October 1995

President of ANTEL Telecommunications R. Lombardo.

Timelines
National Visitors
15 September 1995

A team led by Walter Oelert created atoms of antihydrogen for the first time at CERN’s Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) facility. Nine of these atoms were produced in collisions between antiprotons and xenon atoms over a period of 3 weeks. Each one remained in existence for about 40 billionths of a second, travelled at nearly the speed of light over a path of 10 metres and then annihilated with ordinary matter. The annihilation produced the signal that showed that the anti-atoms had been created.

Timelines
The story of antimatter, The history of CERN
23 June 1995

The CERN Council admits Japan as an observer state. Japan announces a financial contribution to the LHC. The Japanese Minister for Education, Sciences and Culture offers a Daruma doll to CERN’s Director-General. According to Japanese tradition, an eye is painted on the doll to mark the beginning of the LHC project and the second eye must be drawn at the time of its completion. Japan makes two other major financial contributions to the LHC project in 1996 and 1998.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
15 June 1995

Consul of Yemen Z. M. Hajar.

Timelines
National Visitors
1 May 1995

Industrial robots are installed for manipulation of ISOLDE targets, which allows all target changes and manipulations of used target-ion-source systems to be made without human intervention.

Timelines
ISOLDE
16 December 1994

The CERN council approves the construction of the Large Hadron Collider. To achieve the project without enlarging CERN’s budget, they decide to build the accelerator in two stages.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider, The search for the Higgs boson
15 December 1994

ATLAS submitted the technical proposal of the experiment to the LHC Experiments Committee. Approval to proceed with technical design reports was granted in early 1996, followed by the submission of the first report on 15 December of the same year. A long series of technical design reports have been submitted since then. In July 1997, the Committee approved the construction of the ATLAS detector. Teams all over the world built detector components and worked on final technical developments.

 

Timelines
The ATLAS experiment
1 October 1994

In October 1994, Tim Berners-Lee founded the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) – at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology laboratory for computer science – in collaboration with CERN and with support from DARPA and the European Commission.

Timelines
The birth of the World Wide Web
25 August 1994

Vice Prime Minister, Ministry for Science and Education S. Musteata.

Timelines
National Visitors
14 April 1994

The first prototype bending-magnet for the LHC reaches a field of 8.73 Tesla, which is higher than the 8.4 Tesla field at which the LHC will operate in 2012.

Superconducting magnets must be "trained" so that they can maintain the superconducting state necessary to achieve such high fields. Any abnormal termination of the superconducting state, which switches the magnet back to its normal, resistive state, is called a "quench."

LHC Director Lyn Evans receives a hand-written note as he sits in a Finance Committee meeting. It reads:

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
3 December 1993

On 3 December 1993, the Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA) recorded a cosmic ray with an energy of 2x1020 eV. This was a particularly well-measured event because the cosmic rays fell completely inside the detector array and arrived from a nearly vertical direction. This was the highest energy cosmic ray observed at AGASA and greatly exceeded that of any known source.

Timelines
Cosmic rays
21 October 1993

Due to concerns linked to rising costs, the US government votes to cancel the Superconducting Super Collider project. The LHC becomes the sole candidate for a new high-energy hadron collider.

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
1 July 1993

The Czech Republic joins

Statement of the government of the Czech Republic on questions of membership in International Governmental Organizations:

Timelines
Member states
30 April 1993

On 30 April 1993 CERN issued a statement putting the Web into the public domain, ensuring that it would remain an open standard. The organization released the source code of Berners-Lee's hypertext project, WorldWideWeb, into the public domain the same day. WorldWideWeb became free software, available to all. The move had an immediate effect on the spread of the web. By late 1993 there are over 500 known web servers, and the web accounts for 1% of internet traffic. 

Timelines
The birth of the World Wide Web
1 March 1993

The collaboration for A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) propose to build a detector at the LHC to study heavy-ion collisions. The letter of intent marks the first official use of the name ALICE.

Read the ALICE letter of intent

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
17 February 1993

National Council of Science and Technology President C.C. Villanueva and CERN Director-General C. Rubbia.

 
 
Timelines
National Visitors
31 December 1992

By a letter dated 16 December 1992, the Permanent Mission of the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic (CSFR) to the United Nations in Geneva informed CERN that the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic would cease to exist on 31 December 1992 and that two new states – the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic – would succeed it as from 1 January 1993.

The letter states:

Timelines
Member states
1 October 1992

The Toroidal LHC Apparatus collaboration propose to build a multipurpose detector at the LHC. The letter of intent they submit to the LHC Experiments Committee marks the first official use of the name ATLAS. Two collaborations called ASCOT and EAGLE combine to form ATLAS.

Read the ATLAS letter of intent

Timelines
The Large Hadron Collider
1 October 1992

The A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS (ATLAS) collaboration proposed to build a general-purpose detector at the LHC, an idea born in the 1980s. The letter of intent was submitted to the LHC Experiments Committee, which marked the first official use of the name ATLAS.

Timelines
The ATLAS experiment
1 July 1992

Hungary

Timelines
Member states
26 June 1992

First experiment at the ISOLDE Proton-Synchrotron Booster.

The first experiment was carried out on June 26, where the beta-proton decay of the neon isotope with mass number 17 was studied. This experiment was relevant for the understanding of nuclear halo structure, first proposed at ISOLDE.

Timelines
ISOLDE
29 May 1992

The new ISOLDE PSB Facility has two isotope separators, a general-purpose separator with one magnet (GPS) and a high-resolution separator with two magnets, similar to the ISOLDE III design. The target handling in the facility is fully automatized with robots. 

Timelines
ISOLDE
12 December 1991

The first web server outside of Europe was installed on 12 December 1991 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California. In 1993, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois released its Mosaic browser, which was easy to run and install on ordinary PCs and Macintosh computers. The steady trickle of new websites became a flood. The world’s First International World-Wide Web conference, held at CERN in May, was hailed as the “Woodstock of the web”.

Timelines
The birth of the World Wide Web
15 October 1991

The Fly's Eye Mirrors (Image: Courtesy of University of Utah)

On 15 October 1991 the HiRes Fly's Eye cosmic-ray detector in Utah, US, recorded the highest-energy cosmic ray ever detected. Located in the desert in Dugway Proving Grounds 120 kilometres southwest of Salt Lake City, the Fly's Eye detects cosmic rays by observing the light that they cause when they strike the atmosphere.

Timelines
Cosmic rays
15 October 1991

On 15 October 1991 the Fly's Eye cosmic-ray detector in Utah, US, recorded the highest-energy cosmic ray ever detected. Located in the desert in Dugway Proving Grounds 120 kilometres southwest of Salt Lake City, the Fly's Eye detects cosmic rays by observing the light that they cause when they strike the atmosphere.

Timelines
6 August 1991

On 6 August 1991, Tim Berners-Lee posted a summary of the World Wide Web project on several internet newsgroups, including alt.hypertext, which was for hypertext enthusiasts. The move marked the debut of the web as a publicly available service on the internet.

Timelines
The birth of the World Wide Web
1 July 1991

The first contacts between Poland and CERN were established in 1959 when several scholarships were awarded to young Polish physicists from Cracow and Warsaw. This soon developed into a wider collaboration between CERN and Polish institutes. In 1964 Poland became an observer state at CERN, the only country from Eastern Europe to accede to this status. In 1991, Poland became the 16th member of CERN, and thus the first member state from the former Eastern block.

Timelines
Member states
15 March 1991

Captain Regent of the Republic of San Marino.

Timelines
National Visitors
10 January 1991

In 1991, an early WWW system was released to the high-energy-physics community via the CERN program library. It included the simple browser, web server software and a library, implementing the essential functions for developers to build their own software. A wide range of universities and research laboratories started to use it. A little later it was made generally available via the internet, especially to the community of people working on hypertext systems.

Timelines
The birth of the World Wide Web
1 January 1991

On 1 January 1991, Finland joined CERN as the organization's 15th member state. The Finnish government ratified the CERN convention and deposited the formal accession papers with the Director-General of UNESCO on 28 December 1990. On 28 January 1991 a full delegation of Finnish politicians and scientists came to Geneva to celebrate the official hoisting of the Finnish flag in front of the CERN entrance. The Finnish delegation was led by Jaakko Numminen, Secretary-General of the Finnish Ministry of Education and Science, and Antti Hynninen, Finnish Ambassador to the United Nations.

Timelines
Member states
20 December 1990

By Christmas 1990, Berners-Lee had defined the Web’s basic concepts, the URL, http and html, and he had written the first browser and server software. Info.cern.ch was the address of the world's first website and web server, running on a NeXT computer at CERN. The world's first web page address was http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html, which centred on information regarding the WWW project.

Timelines
The birth of the World Wide Web, Computing at CERN, The history of CERN
19 December 1990

On 19 December 1990, at noon, the beam from the Synchrocyclotron (SC) is stopped. At the end of the eighties the decision was taken to shut down the SC.

The ISOLDE programme should, however, continue at CERN and new facility will be built for an external beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster

Timelines
ISOLDE
10 October 1990

(image: The basic principle of the RILIS technique: Two laser beams  tuned to transitions between atomic levels - blue and yellow arrows - excite the atoms and a third beam induces the ionization)

The traditional ion sources used at ISOLDE were based on surface ionization and ionization in a plasma. These techniques together with different target matrices gave a large variety of beams for more than 20 years. A major step in improving the purity of and the number of available elements came in 1989 with a new technique based on laser ionization.

Timelines
ISOLDE
13 November 1989

This photo was taken on 13 November 1989 at the inauguration of the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider. From the left, Princess Margriet of the Netherlands, King Carl Gustav of Sweden, CERN Council President Josef Rembser, President Francois Mitterand of France, President Jean-Pascal Delamuraz of Switzerland, Carlo Rubbia, Director-General of CERN at the time.

Timelines
The Large Electron-Positron Collider
13 August 1989

The OPAL experiment recorded the very first collision at about five past midnight on 13 August 1989 and the other three experiments followed soon after. The first fully-fledged physics run began on 20 September and continued for three months. During this time, the experiments each recorded around 30,000 Z particles, enough for the first data analysis to get under way.

Timelines
The Large Electron-Positron Collider
14 July 1989

With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was – and still is – the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions.

Timelines
The Large Electron-Positron Collider, The history of CERN, CERN accelerators, The search for the Higgs boson
1 July 1989

Astrophysicists detected pulsed gamma-ray emissions from the Crab pulsar with energies that exceed 100 billion electronvolts (GeV). A pulsar is a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star that emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation. The Whipple Observatory 10-metre reflector, operating a 37-pixel camera, was used to observe the Crab Nebula in TeV gamma rays. The paper announcing their finding was published on July 1 1989.

Timelines
Cosmic rays
12 March 1989

Tim Berners-Lee made a first proposal for information management at CERN in March 1989 (no exact date is given). A later version was written in 1990, but this early document is particularly interesting because it includes annotations by his boss, Mike Sendall, whose general comment was ‘Vague but exciting…’! The project eventually grew to become the World Wide Web.  

Timelines
From the archive

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